Ruff Guide to a Dog Friendly Home

Ruff Guide to a Dog Friendly Home

Dogs are lovable for a reason. They’re full of positive vibes that they make us smile effortlessly. Their fur ball bodies and witty tail wags drive away stress. Even their silly grin and boisterous howls and skimps are enough to set us in the mood.

Yes, that’s the reason why they’re not just great house pets, but also make excellent buddies as well.

But it’s not a one-way street because we also need to do our part to make sure that our dogs lead a happy and healthy life. Bring back the favor to them by making your home a haven for your dogs.

Let your dogs roam freely inside your accident-proof home or backyard that’s conducive to their development. Give them easy access to necessities like food and water and a place for them to hygienically discharge. Let them play with some chew bones or perhaps a toy so that they won’t munch on your furniture.

Ensure the best standard of living for your dog.

It’s all about doing your best to be a responsible dog owner so that they stay healthy, live long, and in turn, will be ever-more loving to you. The examples shown above are some of the things you can do, but those are just a glimpse of what you really should do to make your canine buddy love you even more!

Feel compelled to learn more? Well, feel free to check out this informative and stunning AXA graphic.

Ruff Guide to a Dog Friendly Home

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Pablo the Great Pyrenees, Border Collie Mix

Pablo the Great Pyrenees, Border Collie Mix

Our shelter just received a plethora of puppies. Introducing Pablo (pictured above), Panda, Patches, Perdita, Poncho, Petey and Pongo. These super cute fluff balls are two month old Great Pyrenees, Border Collie mixes. Almost impossible to find a sweeter combination, and frankly we almost can’t take it. These pups will be ready to find new homes very soon. Scroll down to see the rest of the litter. Submitted by the Humane Society of Morgan County Georgia.

Petey…

Pablo the Great Pyrenees, Border Collie Mix

Panda…

Panda

Perdita…

Perdita the Great Pyrenees, Border Collie Mix

Patches…

Patches the Great Pyrenees, Border Collie Mix

Pongo…

Pongo

Poncho…

Poncho

Today’s DogPerDay Sponsor…

Relationship Magic: Waking Up Together

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Holly the Yorkshire Terrier

Holly the Yorkshire Terrier

Holly, my Yorkie, and I recently moved to the beach on Long Island. Holly has never associated with dogs and certainly doesn’t believe she is one. She hates the beach because it’s wet and dirty. I finally got her to step on the sand for a minute, but every time she heard a small wave this was the terrified look I got. Submitted by Christina Z.

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Oreo the Border Collie, Labrador Retriever Mix

Oreo the Border Collie, Labrador Retriever Mix

The above photo is of my little guy at eight weeks old. He was the last remaining from his litter. Upon first meeting, the little rascal jumped at my legs and demanded be held and taken home. He is almost two years old now and loves to chew my shoes, play fetch, herd small children, jump-up and lick people, and play tug-of-war with his leash. He dislikes/fears moving water (Why? you’re half Lab!), and small dogs; hates leashes and harnesses. Submitted by proud father, Xin C.

Oreo the Border Collie, Labrador Retriever Mix

Oreo the Border Collie, Labrador Retriever Mix

Oreo the Border Collie, Labrador Retriever Mix

Oreo the Border Collie, Labrador Retriever Mix

The Farmer's Dog

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How To Keep a Dog House Warm In the Winter

How To Keep a Dog House Warm In the Winter

Sometimes it can be challenging to come up with ways to keep your dog warm in the winter, particularly in his or her dog house. Though you may take some easy steps to keep the dog house warm, you might have to adopt some drastic measures if you are in extremely cold regions.

Most of the time the simplest way to heat up pet houses in places where it gets really cold is by adding a commercial heating unit. But what else can you do to keep your furry friend warm in the winter? Below we will take a look at some tips to help you achieve this. Let’s get started!

Understand Your Breed’s Needs

Know your dog breed’s specific susceptibilities to the cold. A few dog breeds are more disposed to the cold compared to others, while other breeds adapt really well to the cold. Those pups that do not respond to the cold should not be outdoor dogs. But, even pups that cope well in extreme cold require shelter and warmth to grow as outdoor pets.

Some breeds that cope well in the cold are Siberian Huskies, Alaskan Malamutes, and Chow Chows. Dogs that have a harder time coping are toy dogs, Dobermans, hairless and short hair dogs, as well as Greyhounds. The shaven or overly clipped dog falls under this category since thick winter coats are a dog’s insulation.

How To Keep a Dog House Warm In the Winter

Change the Location

The easiest way to improve the temperature in your pet’s house might be by moving it to a much warmer location, like a heated garage.

Although you cannot put the dog house indoors, it will remain much warmer when it is placed in a location that is protected from the wind. You might also put it against the house or another heated structure. This will shelter the pup house from the wind and will help increase the temperature slightly in the doghouse.

When the wind is not an issue, you could consider putting the doghouse in an area that gets sufficient sunlight — especially in the afternoon. You can get a solar dog house, but it does not work at night.

Insulate the Dog House

A dog’s natural body heat helps keep his kennel warm. Hence, the better the dog house is insulated, the warmer it stays. Therefore, make sure that all gaps and cracks in the doghouse get covered.

Do ensure that the dog house has a door that can be used to retain the warm air within. Consider raising the house off the ground. Then put a padded bedding material, blanket or pillow on the floor where your dog can sleep.

This will not only provide comfort for your furry friend, but it will also help in insulating both your dog and his house from a cold ground. For your furry friend’s pleasure you might check out Mobile Dog Grooming.

Build a Heating Unit

If you are handy with tools, you could put in a light fixture inside on the ceiling of the pet house. When you fit it with an incandescent light bulb, it helps keep the dog house warmer. You can do this only when the house offers enough headroom to put in the light high enough to prevent contact with your dog.

A ceramic fixture is safer when used instead of the plastic units, then put a fire-resistant guard or baffle around the light bulb to prevent anything from contacting the fixture or bulb. Use only pet-safe, red bulbs as an alternative to white bulbs. That way your dog can get some sleep.

Buy a Heater

There are several commercial, easy to use products available which will help warm up your dog’s house. Some manufacturers make heated mats that can be used on the bottom of your dog’s house.

It is essential that you monitor your dog when such electrical devices are used. Do not use these kinds of devices with dogs who will possibly chew on them. In addition, be sure to frequently keep an eye on the temperature of the heating device to prevent accidents and burns. If preferable, you can opt to start over by purchasing a heated doghouse that will keep your dog warm during cold weather.

How To Keep a Dog House Warm In the Winter

Capture Extra Heat

If you want to pamper your dog, you could consider using heat from the house to keep your dog’s kennel warm by connecting a dryer hose. How do you make this contraption? Cut a round hole near the upper part of your dog’s house that can take a connection of the aluminum dryer hose inside your house.

How do you get the heat to reach your dog’s house? Link the dryer hose to the house and your dog’s house on either side. Then to help move the heat towards the doghouse, you can use a small fan for blowing the heat towards the doghouse. There’s actually a video here that goes into some of this.

When It Is Extremely Cold…

When it is extremely cold for long periods of time, bring in all outdoor dogs. Even using a barn is better and warmer than an outdoor dog house. Keep in mind that the more insulation layers you add to the kennel, the cozier it will be. You can cover the kennel using an old duvet, then placing a tarpaulin over it to strengthen the protection.

Be sure everyday to check the dog house to ensure it is dry and has no leaks in the roof. Cold and wet is way more dangerous and uncomfortable compared to dry cold. Do make sure that the bedding is dry and warm. Lying on dirty bedding can cause infected skin patches and sores. Likeable Pets can treat these infections.

Wrapping up

Though some dog breeds can withstand more cold than others, no pet is entirely immune to cold temperatures. Consider raising the kennel off the ground. Then add padded bedding, blankets or pillows on the floor for your dog to sleep on. This helps provide comfort for your furry friend and also acts as an insulating material for your dog and his house.

Alice Lee

About the Author: My name is Alice Lee, I am the Co-founder of Likeablepets.com. I am a certified and experienced professional dog groomer. Other than my passion for animals, I also like to blog on my spare time. Most of my stories involve my experiences as a dog groomer, and the everyday tasks that I have to do. I love animals so much, that I have dedicated most of my time to caring and nurturing all animals as if they were my own. As a person of professionalism, I also share some personal tips about dog grooming, and how you can care for your pets at home.

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Brandy the Shetland Sheepdog

Brandy the Shetland Sheepdog

This is my little bundle of joy. Her name is Brandy and she is six years old. Brandy loves to sit around and be lazy. She also loves treats and any kind of food she can get her paws on. She will bark from time to time, but all she’ll do is make noise she won’t actually do anything bad.😊 She also loves, loves, loves to cuddle and give kisses! Submitted by Kristin D.

Brandy the Shetland Sheepdog

Brandy the Shetland Sheepdog

Brandy the Shetland Sheepdog

Brandy the Shetland Sheepdog

DogPerDay recommends The Farmer’s Dog real dog food…

Goose the English Setter

Goose is a year old Llewellin English Setter. He is extremely polite and gentle. He makes a serious face whenever he wants to discuss his mom’s absence.

Goose’s Mom says, “As an Animal Science major, I appreciate a company that doesn’t try to fit into a sensationalized trend such as ‘raw’ or ‘grain-free’, and instead focuses on using high quality ingredients to provide optimal nutrition. It’s nutrients that matter, and giving those nutrients in high-quality ingredients makes a world of difference. I’d take The Farmer’s Dog recipes over the other guy’s any day!”

The Farmer's Dog

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