Carly the Golden Retriever

Carly the Golden Retriever

This is my 14 week old cream-colored Golden Retriever, Carly. She loves to tear around the house, carrying a teddy and chasing one of many squeaky balls she owns. Although only 14 weeks old, she has the run of the house, racing around playing wherever she pleases, which usually finishes when she jumps up on your lap for a cuddle and a well earned snooze. Carly is intelligent and mischievous. She will wait for you to turn your back then grab one of your “new” shoes and race off to nibble on it in private. She brings a life and love to the house that only a puppy can. Submitted by Tim D.

Carly the Golden Retriever

Carly the Golden Retriever

Carly the Golden Retriever

The Farmer's Dog

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Nora the Black Labrador, Australian Shepherd Mix

Nora the Black Labrador, Australian Shepherd Mix

This is Nora! She is a Black Lab, Aussie Shepherd mix. We adopted her from a shelter when she was four months old, and she’s been our baby ever since. She enjoys sleeping in human beds, and her human sisters fight over who gets Nora in their bed at night 🙂 She loves swimming, hiking, running, and going on walks, but can’t figure out how fetch works, and has no interest in it. If you ask her “Nora, do you want to go for a walk?” She will run to the door, and sit waiting for her leash. And she loves napping on the couch, we like to call her “Cat dog.” She is my best friend and I wouldn’t change that for the world. Submitted by Emma M.

Nora the Black Labrador, Australian Shepherd Mix

The Farmer's Dog

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Should I be Worried If My Dog Has Worms

Should I be Worried If My Dog Has Worms

We all want what is best for our dogs. They are a member of the family, right? Unfortunately, our four-legged friends are very susceptible to parasites known as worms. There are four different kinds of worms: tapeworms, roundworms, hookworms, and whipworms. Roundworms and tapeworms are easily identifiable in the stool of your pet. Dogs become infested with worms by ingestion. Worm eggs are ingested when your dog eats contaminated soil or stool. It is frightening to think that worms can kill our pets. This article will help understand what worms are and how you can help your pet if you suspect they have worms.

Should I Be Worried?

While intestinal worms are far less dangerous than heartworms, all infections should be treated upon first notice of side effects. Severe cases of heartworms have been known to cause death upon dogs that are not treated in time. Heartworms do not show many obvious physical signs either. Intestinal worms can sometimes be seen in the animal’s stool and vomit. Other symptoms include: pot bellied appearance, change in appetite, and weight loss. When treated in time, your furry friend should be able to live a normal life free of worms.

Should I be Worried If My Dog Has Worms

What Should I Do If My Dog Has Worms?

If your dog is showing signs that he or she may have worms, it would be a good idea to consult with a veterinarian as soon as possible. As mentioned above, untreated worms can be very harmful to your dog. If a veterinarian is unavailable, there are things that you do at home to help. http://dogsbarn.com/dog-worming-tablets/ is an incredible resource when searching worming remedies for dogs. There are tablets, syrups, and granules that you can feed your dog to rid them of worms. Always consult with your veterinarian and notify them in your dogs progression.

What Do Worms Do?

Since worms are parasites, they suck the nutrients from your dog. While the worms rob your dog’s nutrients, they will breed themselves and spread further into the intestines. This will cause your dog to become severely malnourished and dehydrated. Heart worms are very dangerous because they typically do not show any obvious signs. This is why routine visits to your veterinarian are very important.

What Signs To Look For:

— Continuous coughing
— Vomiting
— Diarrhea
— Less energy than normal
— Pot bellied appearance
— Gray or dull coat
— Skin irritations
— Worms in your dog’s stool
— Change in appetite
— Weight loss

Routine visits to a veterinarian are the best way to ensure your dog’s health. Keep in mind that the sooner you notice and treat the symptoms of worms, the better chance your dog will have of not developing more serious problems. Remember that your veterinarian will have the best advice on how to treat worms in your dog. Worms are definitely something that pet owners not only need to be worried about, but they also need to be aware of the symptoms. The more you know, the more you will be able to help your dog.

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How to Train Your Dog to Accompany You in Your Watersports Experience

How to Train Your Dog to Accompany You in Your Watersports Experience

I have never met a person that does not enjoy a good day on the water. The only thing that could make a good lake day better would be if our dogs were able to join in on the fun. Dogs love the water as much as you do, and watersports are a great way for you to bond with your four-legged friend. Just like with humans, practice makes perfect. It may take some time for your pup to get the hang of cruising on a paddle board but the hard work will be worth it. There are many different watersport activities that dogs can take part in. What can you do to help train your dog to join you in watersports? .

Get Them Interested

Dogs are naturally curious animals and when they see you launch a kayak into the water they are going to want in on the fun. Dogs have incredible instincts and just like humans, they can decide whether jumping off of a dock into a lake is a good idea or not. They will most likely be curious after they see their human taking the leap. It is a good idea to take baby steps when introducing your dog to new activities. Do not force your dog to try something if they do not seem comfortable. This could potentially put you and your pet in harms way.

Pick A Reward SystemHow to Train Your Dog to Accompany You in Your Watersports Experience

Canines live for praise. If you have ever observed or taken part in obedience classes, you can see that treats are often used as praise for good behavior or learning a new skill. Especially in water, it may not always be possible to have some Pup-peroni treats with you. Instead, you can bring a special toy for your pet to play with in the boat or kayak. Also, simple positive verbal praise and a belly rub will sometimes do the trick. Dogs have an innate ability to pick up on theirs human’s emotions. If you are having fun, chances are your dog is having fun too.

Choose A Water Sport That is Not Too Difficult

Not all dogs have the same capabilities. Some enjoying running and others enjoy swimming. There are also others that do not seem interested in any physical exercise at all. I can assure you, there is a water sport for everyone as well as your furry companion. Water sports include: boating, kayaking, surfing, swimming, and even a game of fetch from the end of a dock counts! A lot of information on water sports for dogs can be found on kayakudos.com. If your dog is older, you may want to consider something that will not be as physically demanding on your pet. Keep in mind that you should never try an activity that is outside of your dog’s own capabilities.

Since dogs tend to follow us around wherever we go anyway, it should not be too difficult to train your dog to accompany you in your water sports experience. This is an excellent way for you and your dog to bond and have a few good laughs. Not to mention, water sports are fantastic sources of exercise for humans and canines alike.

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Why You Should Crate Train a Dog

Why You Should Crate Train a Dog

Welcoming a new dog into your family is an exciting time, but the process can be difficult, as there are lots of factors to consider. You need to make your dog comfortable and ensure they feel safe, while house training them and teaching them good behavior. For these reasons, it is highly recommended that you crate train your new dog, as it has many benefits.

Here’s our list of why you should crate train your dog…

1. Make your dog feel safe

Some people think that crates are cruel, but when used properly, they are quite the opposite. When trained properly, dogs see crates as their safe space, so whenever they feel scared or uneasy, they know they can retreat into their crate for safety. Being in the crate should always be your dog’s choice, and the crate itself should be sized perfectly for your dog. Follow Top Dog Hub’s dog crate recommendations to choose the right crate for your dog. Once your dog is crate trained, you’ll find that he is happier and calmer.

2. House training is easierWhy You Should Crate Train a Dog

When a crate is correctly sized, there will be no room within the crate for your dog to do his business. Because dogs don’t like to sleep in soiled beds, crate training will also assist with house training. If you need to leave your dog in a crate for long periods of time, they’ll learn to hold themselves so that they don’t make a mess, which leaves you with a cleaner house and a happier dog.

3. Limit damage

Dogs are animals, and sometimes they get out of control. We all know it happens, and we’ve seen the many dog shaming pictures and videos on the internet. By using a crate, you can avoid these sorts of disasters altogether. Crate training eventually allows you to leave the house for up to eight hours with the dog happily in the crate with his chew toys, so that you can avoid these sorts of situations. If you’re happier with your dog, then your dog will be happier too, so it’s a win win.

4. Easier vet visits

At some point your dog will need to go to the vet. If he needs to stay overnight, this will be a severely traumatic experience for your dog if he isn’t crate trained. The beds that dogs stay in at the vets are crates themselves, so without proper crate training, this will cause fear and anxiety in your dog which may result in a longer healing time. Crate training your dog is a great option for avoiding this.

You may think that crate training is a cruel punishment for a dog, but if you’re using it in that way then you’re doing it wrong. Crate training a dog properly can reduce stress in their lives as they see the crate as their own safe space and can go there when they need to chill out. Consider properly crate training your dog and you’ll find that both you and your dog are much more calm.

 

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Kate the Chocolate Labrador Retriever

Kate the Chocolate Labrador Retriever

Sweet girl Kate is 10 years old and weighs about 80 pounds. She is oh so friendly, well behaved and good with other dogs. This sweet old lady is great on a leash, but she does move slowly. She does not want to be in a shelter at her age. She would love to be in a new home where she can take life easy and slow. Submitted by Washington Wilkes Animal Shelter.

Kate the Chocolate Labrador Retriever

Kate the Chocolate Labrador Retriever

Kate the Chocolate Labrador Retriever

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6 Creative Ways to Exercise High Energy Dogs

6 Creative Ways to Exercise High Energy Dogs

Do you have a highly energetic dog? She definitely needs a way to channel all of that excess energy or else she might find a lot of destructive ways to use it up… like destroying your belongings or digging holes in the backyard.

Does this sound familiar?

Well, it is a good idea to have creative ways to help them burn off energy in healthy, fun and productive ways, while of course keeping their minds stimulated. If you want to learn what these activities are, then please keep on reading below.

Six Creative Ways To Exercise Your Highly Energetic Dog

1. Running Partner

Planning to beat your personal record in the upcoming marathon? Well, why don’t you take your highly energetic dog with you when you train. They can be your best running buddy. Just start slow and run at a pace they are much comfortable with, then you can gradually increase the speed and even the distance.

Or you can just simply run around the yard, chasing each other. This is an absolutely fun way to burn off energy for your dog, and burn some calories for you, too!

2. Keep Waving that Flirt Pole

Highly energetic dogs are much like cats in that they love chasing soft objects that flap and flutter. So yes, this means that if cats can go crazy over wand toys that have feathers or small fluffy things the end, then your active dog will too! In fact, they even have name for these things. They’re called flirt poles.

There are plenty of ready-made flirt poles you can purchase. They are specially and safely designed for your dog, but you can also make one by yourself. You can make one using PVC pipe that is about four to six feet long, a rope, and some stuffed toy6 Creative Ways to Exercise High Energy Dogs

Like what this pole does to a cat, a flirt pole taps into the predatory instincts of your dog and will encourage it to concentrate on, chase and then attack its prey found at the end of the rope as you are flicking the pole around. This will definitely be a game changer for your highly energetic dog.

The main benefit of playing with the flirt pole is that will give your dog physical stimulation as they run back and forth trying to catch the toy. But at the same time, there will also be mental stimulation since they will try to outsmart you and anticipate the toy’s movement.

But what’s even better is that it will exhaust your active dog without exhausting you. Children can also easily stand still and wave the wand. It doesn’t take much. You don’t need to look for a huge yard to play with the flirt pole. You can play with it in your driveway or on a sidewalk outside your home. You can basically do this exercise anywhere and anytime. During rainy days, you can play indoors with a half-sized flirt pole.

I also suggest playing with the flirt pole before you go on walks. Five to ten minutes will do. This is a good way to expend some of your dog’s excitement. The more you tire out your pooch before her walk, the less excited energy she will have during your walk.

3. Set Up Obstacle Courses

Setting up obstacle courses will not only exercise your highly energetic dog but will also train her agility. This exercise provides physical as well as more mental stimulation. It is a fun way to give your furry companion something they can achieve and focus on.

There are professional classes available to instructors that offer obstacle course training for your dog, but you can also do it by yourself. There’s no need to shell out a lot of money. It is actually easy enough to create your own safe and fun home obstacle right in your backyard. All you need are a few cheap supplies or even things that are just lying around your home.

To make things easier for you, Everything for Our Pets will be sharing three common types of obstacles you can easily set up for your dog… these are weave poles, jumps, and tunnels. But just a gentle reminder, safety should be the most important feature for every obstacle course, so always keep in mind your dog’s well-being while you are setting up everything.

Weave Poles: It is very easy to make your own weave poles! All you need are inexpensive PVC pipes. Stick lengths of pipe into the ground, making enough space between the pipes for your dog to safely run or walk through.

Just watch out for any immovable and hard materials that could possibly injure your dog just in case she miscalculates the distance between two poles. Make sure to secure the poles properly so they won’t fall over whenever your dog runs through them.

You can also purchase orange traffic cones rather than PVC pipes if you don’t want any pipes popping out all over your yard. Traffic cones present more of a challenge that the standard weave poles.

Jumps: We will also be using PVC pipes for bar jumps. Set the pipes at different increments and make sure there will be enough room for your furball to comfortably jump over the bar.

Also make sure  that the bar can be easily knocked down so your dog does not hit something solid and injure herself if she doesn’t jump high enough.

Tunnels: It is possible to make an obstacle course tunnel from scratch. But there are a lot of pet owners who find it much easier and even less time consuming to just repurpose an existing play tunnel. If you have kids you can use your child’s old flexible play tunnel, this will make an excellent obstacle.

If you don’t have any, there are plenty of inexpensive ones you can purchase at your local department store or online. Just choose one that is lightweight but is also heavy enough that it will not move when your dog runs through it.

6 Creative Ways to Exercise High Energy Dogs

4. Swimming and Water Play

During a hot day, swimming and water play can be just the ticket for your active dog. Take your dog for a dip in your local lake or beach. She will get a great workout, use up some of her energy, and the best of all, stay cool in the heat.

But take note that not every dog is made for swimming. There are breeds that are bad swimmers. Fortunately, there are life jackets designed especially for dogs. This will allow him to still be in the water even if he is not really the greatest swimmer. In this way your dog can get his much needed exercise while staying safe.

5. Catch and Fetch, Balls and Bubbles

You can play this with your dog in the yard or at the park. If you have ample space in your home, you can play more controlledforms of this game. Since balls have always been a favorite for active dogs, it is the most efficient tool for this activity. Just make sure that you get one that is the right size of your dog. A large dog might get choked on a ball that is too small while a small dog might it difficult to handle a large ball and will eventually give up playing. With proper training, your dog can even learn to play a dog form of soccer using large ball.6 Creative Ways to Exercise High Energy Dogs

Another fun way to play catch and fetch is by using bubbles. Your dog should find bubbles to be fascinating, so she will absolutelyhave a great time chasing them all over the yard and trying to pop them.

You can use those with simple bubble wands that can release one or two bubbles at a time, but I one idea is to get a battery-operated bubble blower that can shoot many bubbles at once. This will really get you highly energetic dog running and leaping and generally going nuts. Remember that bubbles might get into your dog’s mouth, so make to use only non-toxic bubble solution.

6. Add Some Weights

Have you ever gone backpacking? Then you absolutely know how exhausting it can be to carry around 25 or 30 pounds on your back while hiking. For your dogs, you can buy a little doggie backpack and add a safe amount of weight. This is a great way to burn that extra energy on daily walks.

How much weight you should use? Just try about 10% of the total body weight of your dog. For example, if your dog weighs 50 lb., insert a 5 pound weight.

Final Thought

As long as you use your imagination, you can absolutely think of different creative activities and games for your dog to burn off extra energy. Take note that a highly energetic dog can get easily bored. They will find ways to relieve their boredom and may end up developing behavior you don’t want them to exhibit. A simple routine of daily exercise will help them remain happy and healthy.

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