Carly the Golden Retriever

Carly the Golden Retriever

This is my 14 week old cream-colored Golden Retriever, Carly. She loves to tear around the house, carrying a teddy and chasing one of many squeaky balls she owns. Although only 14 weeks old, she has the run of the house, racing around playing wherever she pleases, which usually finishes when she jumps up on your lap for a cuddle and a well earned snooze. Carly is intelligent and mischievous. She will wait for you to turn your back then grab one of your “new” shoes and race off to nibble on it in private. She brings a life and love to the house that only a puppy can. Submitted by Tim D.

Carly the Golden Retriever

Carly the Golden Retriever

Carly the Golden Retriever

The Farmer's Dog

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Nora the Black Labrador, Australian Shepherd Mix

Nora the Black Labrador, Australian Shepherd Mix

This is Nora! She is a Black Lab, Aussie Shepherd mix. We adopted her from a shelter when she was four months old, and she’s been our baby ever since. She enjoys sleeping in human beds, and her human sisters fight over who gets Nora in their bed at night 🙂 She loves swimming, hiking, running, and going on walks, but can’t figure out how fetch works, and has no interest in it. If you ask her “Nora, do you want to go for a walk?” She will run to the door, and sit waiting for her leash. And she loves napping on the couch, we like to call her “Cat dog.” She is my best friend and I wouldn’t change that for the world. Submitted by Emma M.

Nora the Black Labrador, Australian Shepherd Mix

The Farmer's Dog

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Should I be Worried If My Dog Has Worms

Should I be Worried If My Dog Has Worms

We all want what is best for our dogs. They are a member of the family, right? Unfortunately, our four-legged friends are very susceptible to parasites known as worms. There are four different kinds of worms: tapeworms, roundworms, hookworms, and whipworms. Roundworms and tapeworms are easily identifiable in the stool of your pet. Dogs become infested with worms by ingestion. Worm eggs are ingested when your dog eats contaminated soil or stool. It is frightening to think that worms can kill our pets. This article will help understand what worms are and how you can help your pet if you suspect they have worms.

Should I Be Worried?

While intestinal worms are far less dangerous than heartworms, all infections should be treated upon first notice of side effects. Severe cases of heartworms have been known to cause death upon dogs that are not treated in time. Heartworms do not show many obvious physical signs either. Intestinal worms can sometimes be seen in the animal’s stool and vomit. Other symptoms include: pot bellied appearance, change in appetite, and weight loss. When treated in time, your furry friend should be able to live a normal life free of worms.

Should I be Worried If My Dog Has Worms

What Should I Do If My Dog Has Worms?

If your dog is showing signs that he or she may have worms, it would be a good idea to consult with a veterinarian as soon as possible. As mentioned above, untreated worms can be very harmful to your dog. If a veterinarian is unavailable, there are things that you do at home to help. http://dogsbarn.com/dog-worming-tablets/ is an incredible resource when searching worming remedies for dogs. There are tablets, syrups, and granules that you can feed your dog to rid them of worms. Always consult with your veterinarian and notify them in your dogs progression.

What Do Worms Do?

Since worms are parasites, they suck the nutrients from your dog. While the worms rob your dog’s nutrients, they will breed themselves and spread further into the intestines. This will cause your dog to become severely malnourished and dehydrated. Heart worms are very dangerous because they typically do not show any obvious signs. This is why routine visits to your veterinarian are very important.

What Signs To Look For:

— Continuous coughing
— Vomiting
— Diarrhea
— Less energy than normal
— Pot bellied appearance
— Gray or dull coat
— Skin irritations
— Worms in your dog’s stool
— Change in appetite
— Weight loss

Routine visits to a veterinarian are the best way to ensure your dog’s health. Keep in mind that the sooner you notice and treat the symptoms of worms, the better chance your dog will have of not developing more serious problems. Remember that your veterinarian will have the best advice on how to treat worms in your dog. Worms are definitely something that pet owners not only need to be worried about, but they also need to be aware of the symptoms. The more you know, the more you will be able to help your dog.

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How to Train Your Dog to Accompany You in Your Watersports Experience

How to Train Your Dog to Accompany You in Your Watersports Experience

I have never met a person that does not enjoy a good day on the water. The only thing that could make a good lake day better would be if our dogs were able to join in on the fun. Dogs love the water as much as you do, and watersports are a great way for you to bond with your four-legged friend. Just like with humans, practice makes perfect. It may take some time for your pup to get the hang of cruising on a paddle board but the hard work will be worth it. There are many different watersport activities that dogs can take part in. What can you do to help train your dog to join you in watersports? .

Get Them Interested

Dogs are naturally curious animals and when they see you launch a kayak into the water they are going to want in on the fun. Dogs have incredible instincts and just like humans, they can decide whether jumping off of a dock into a lake is a good idea or not. They will most likely be curious after they see their human taking the leap. It is a good idea to take baby steps when introducing your dog to new activities. Do not force your dog to try something if they do not seem comfortable. This could potentially put you and your pet in harms way.

Pick A Reward SystemHow to Train Your Dog to Accompany You in Your Watersports Experience

Canines live for praise. If you have ever observed or taken part in obedience classes, you can see that treats are often used as praise for good behavior or learning a new skill. Especially in water, it may not always be possible to have some Pup-peroni treats with you. Instead, you can bring a special toy for your pet to play with in the boat or kayak. Also, simple positive verbal praise and a belly rub will sometimes do the trick. Dogs have an innate ability to pick up on theirs human’s emotions. If you are having fun, chances are your dog is having fun too.

Choose A Water Sport That is Not Too Difficult

Not all dogs have the same capabilities. Some enjoying running and others enjoy swimming. There are also others that do not seem interested in any physical exercise at all. I can assure you, there is a water sport for everyone as well as your furry companion. Water sports include: boating, kayaking, surfing, swimming, and even a game of fetch from the end of a dock counts! A lot of information on water sports for dogs can be found on kayakudos.com. If your dog is older, you may want to consider something that will not be as physically demanding on your pet. Keep in mind that you should never try an activity that is outside of your dog’s own capabilities.

Since dogs tend to follow us around wherever we go anyway, it should not be too difficult to train your dog to accompany you in your water sports experience. This is an excellent way for you and your dog to bond and have a few good laughs. Not to mention, water sports are fantastic sources of exercise for humans and canines alike.

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Why You Should Crate Train a Dog

Why You Should Crate Train a Dog

Welcoming a new dog into your family is an exciting time, but the process can be difficult, as there are lots of factors to consider. You need to make your dog comfortable and ensure they feel safe, while house training them and teaching them good behavior. For these reasons, it is highly recommended that you crate train your new dog, as it has many benefits.

Here’s our list of why you should crate train your dog…

1. Make your dog feel safe

Some people think that crates are cruel, but when used properly, they are quite the opposite. When trained properly, dogs see crates as their safe space, so whenever they feel scared or uneasy, they know they can retreat into their crate for safety. Being in the crate should always be your dog’s choice, and the crate itself should be sized perfectly for your dog. Follow Top Dog Hub’s dog crate recommendations to choose the right crate for your dog. Once your dog is crate trained, you’ll find that he is happier and calmer.

2. House training is easierWhy You Should Crate Train a Dog

When a crate is correctly sized, there will be no room within the crate for your dog to do his business. Because dogs don’t like to sleep in soiled beds, crate training will also assist with house training. If you need to leave your dog in a crate for long periods of time, they’ll learn to hold themselves so that they don’t make a mess, which leaves you with a cleaner house and a happier dog.

3. Limit damage

Dogs are animals, and sometimes they get out of control. We all know it happens, and we’ve seen the many dog shaming pictures and videos on the internet. By using a crate, you can avoid these sorts of disasters altogether. Crate training eventually allows you to leave the house for up to eight hours with the dog happily in the crate with his chew toys, so that you can avoid these sorts of situations. If you’re happier with your dog, then your dog will be happier too, so it’s a win win.

4. Easier vet visits

At some point your dog will need to go to the vet. If he needs to stay overnight, this will be a severely traumatic experience for your dog if he isn’t crate trained. The beds that dogs stay in at the vets are crates themselves, so without proper crate training, this will cause fear and anxiety in your dog which may result in a longer healing time. Crate training your dog is a great option for avoiding this.

You may think that crate training is a cruel punishment for a dog, but if you’re using it in that way then you’re doing it wrong. Crate training a dog properly can reduce stress in their lives as they see the crate as their own safe space and can go there when they need to chill out. Consider properly crate training your dog and you’ll find that both you and your dog are much more calm.

 

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