Popo the Mixed Breed

Meet Popo, the latest member of our family. Popo is about nine months old and was a mixed breed stray until two months ago when she came up to my son on a street and then jumped into the passenger side of our car before we could close close the door! So we brought her home. Popo has boundless energy and gets on very well with our other furry family members. She has a very soulful face that is so expressive and we all just love her to bits! We are just so glad she chose to come and live with us. Submitted by Jago S.

Popo with a family member.

Popo with Anubis (brown) and Dino the Husky, ready for bed.

This is Popo with her best friend, Rokku the Husky.

 

Ollie the English Bull Terrier

Ollie is my second Mini English Bull Terrier. He is named in loving memory of Mollie, my first Mini English Bull Terrier. I was very lucky to get this sweet boy, as most breeders do not let “regular people” have their puppies, as they are a breed all of their own. My friend found Ollie posted on the AKC site. Because I had experience with the breed, and had just lost Mollie after almost 14 years (I was devastated,) the breeder let me have Ollie on the condition that I fly to Detroit to get him. He is the best medicine I could ask for, and I am training him to follow in Mollie’s paw prints to do modeling work. Submitted by Jay W.

 

Diamond the Terrier and Banjo the Labrador Retriever

Here are some pictures I took of my dog, Diamond, and my mom’s dog, Banjo. Both dogs live in the same house with me and my parents, so I sorta kinda consider Banjo my dog, too. Diamond is a four year old purebred Red Nose Brindle Pit Bull Terrier, and Banjo is a one-and-a-half year old purebred light cream Labrador Retriever.

Diamond, the rescue Pit, is my owner trained multipurpose service dog for psychiatric alert and response, autism assistance, and medical alert and response. She’s fully task trained and public access trained, as well as a certified AKC Canine Good Citizen. Both her and Banjo passed their AKC Canine Good Citizen (CGC) tests at just a year old. The tester even complimented me on my training skills, especially since I was at a young age of just 15/16 years old at the time.

Banjo, the goofy Lab, is my mom’s multipurpose service dog for mobility assistance and psychiatric response, whom I trained for my mom. He’s fully task trained and public access trained, as well as a certified AKC Canine Good Citizen.

Diamond is my life-saver. I don’t know what I’d ever do without her. She has helped me in many ways, including keeping me from fainting with her very helpful low blood sugar alerts. She interrupts my self-harming behaviors (scratching), and even guides me during episodes of dizziness or dissociation. Of course, she can do many more than just this. She’s just such a smart doggy.

Many people don’t know this, but all service dogs have “off-days” where they may be a little more distracted and what-not, but the majority of the time, they are well-behaved and know when they need to help their handler. Other than the occasional off-day, Diamond and Banjo follow their obedience and task commands perfectly.

Diamond and Banjo both love to learn something new. They’re people-pleasers for sure. LOL. Submitted by Jennica F.

 

Elliot the White English Cream Golden Retriever

Elliot just turned 11 months old. He was 10 months in the photos that are being sent. He is a White English Cream Golden Retriever and we got him at eight weeks old. He amazes us everyday with the things he does. He LOVES the pool, and being in water, and truly loves to play fetch. At night he has to get on my husband and I’s bed, with my youngest daughter (16 years old) and roll all around, taking the covers in his mouth to cover himself and then just lay there. After my daughter says goodnight, he lays still between my husband and I for about five minutes, moves to the other side of my husband and stretches out, lies there five more minutes, then sits up on the edge of the bed… waits… sits… waits… then after about 10 minutes he gets down and lays on the floor! This has to be his nightly routine or he cries and whines until everyone is there together! He needs to have someone petting him at all times when we are sitting, and he watches TV, depending on the show! I cannot imagine our lives without him. Submitted by Valerie C.

 

Will Leaving My Dog at a Pet Hotel Be Stressful for Them?

If you’ve planned a holiday or business trip, or any other trip, boarding your dog may have been your first thought. Some dogs cope with being left alone pretty well, and others don’t. If you’re thinking about leaving them at a pet hotel, you need to evaluate the facility very thoroughly in advance. Leave a number for emergencies and information about any medication your dog is taking. Discuss any behavior issues upfront.

Choosing the Right Pet Hotel or Kennel

Do some research to make sure your dog experiences as little stress as possible at the new place. You can ask your vet, a friend, or a relative about what to look out for and if they can recommend any places. If you decide on a kennel, make sure it’s a membrer of the American Boarding Kennels Association. In addition, check that it’s licensed and look for a certificate proving it complies with the highest industry standards. You can also use a site like PetHotels.com to search for the best hotels near you.

Take the time to visit several different boarding facilities before deciding on one. Look at whether the place is clean and well-organized. You can’t expect it to smell like daisies — dogs are dogs after all — but it certainly shouldn’t reek. The individual kennels must be safe, escape-proof, and large enough to house a dog and their food and water adequately. They shouldn’t be housed outdoors the entire time, leaving the animals to the mercy of the elements.

Usually, people bring their own dog beds to kennels and hotels. You shouldn’t rely on the staff providing each and every dog with a comfortable bed. Options like chew-proof and anti-anxiety beds are available to buy.

Questions to Ask Before Choosing

Ask your facility of choice if the dogs are exercised regularly, what they are fed with, how they are fed, and whether you can leave your own food. Also, ask if they offer training, vet care, grooming, and any other services your dog will or might need. They should let you know what they will need for boarding. Typically, this includes items like a bed, toys, and medical information.

If your pet has special exercise needs, do let them know. Many facilities only let the dogs out for several minutes at a time. This works for some breeds, but not others. You need as much information as possible about what kind of exercise the dogs get.

It’s a good idea to get your dog a few chew toys to keep them distracted when they’re alone at the hotel without you.

Paying a bit extra for the staff to give your dog his or her regular food is recommended. In a kennel, all dogs are usually fed the same food. They get stressed by this sudden change. Their health might suffer as a result. Emphasize the significance of any special diet they’re on. If dogs can play together, ask what the facility does to stop dogs from fighting or escaping. Large dog breeds should never play or exercise with small ones. They should always be in separate groups.

Finally, ask about their policy on canines with behavior issues. Are they supervised or separated? Typically, individual exercise is part of this.

How Will They Feel?

Leaving your dog at a pet hotel has pluses and minuses. The hotel staff can monitor your pet closely and pick up on potential health problems. In the event of an emergency, they can act quickly. If you hire a sitter or get a friend or relative to take care of them, your dog may be unsupervised most of the time.

On the other hand, leaving them at home with someone you know to come over will save them the stress of traveling by car or plane. If you’re flying somewhere and you take them with you, they’ll have to fly in the cargo unless they’re very small. It’s noisy and cold, and they’re not going to love it. Traveling by car is the other option. Many dogs suffer from car sickness or simply can’t bear being in a car for a long time. The best option is booking a pet hotel near your home.

Shadow the Labrador, Golden Retriever Mix & Sassy the Australian Shepherd, Sheltie Mix

I’m sorry but I just had to send photos of both my dogs because they are so inseparable! Shadow is a five year old female Black Lab, Golden Retriever mix and Sassy is a three year old female Aussie, Sheltie mix. They always seem to be involved in off-the-wall antics trying to one up the other. As you can see they are never far from each other. The puppies in these dogs are going to be around for quite awhile. Submitted by David B.