How to Prepare for Your Dog's First Road Trip!

How to Prepare for Your Dog’s First Road Trip!

So you are going on your first road trip with your pup?

We know you’re all giddy and excited about getting to spend quality time with your best friend! Who wouldn’t be? Traveling with your dog can be a fun and memorable experience… If you take the necessary steps to prepare for it.

Read on to find out how to prepare for your dog’s first road trip.

First things first: Is Your Dog ready to Hit the Road?

You might be all set for your road trip, but what about your dog?

If your dog is already cool riding in the car with you, that’s great.  The battle is won. But if Fido isn’t ready to travel yet, you need to help familiarize him with car rides. Take things slowly on this one! The last thing you need on your road trip is a dog that’s terrified of traveling.

Here are a few tips to get your dog ready and steady:

— In the time leading up to your road trip, let your dog sit in a parked car for a few minutes at a time.
— Once your dog gets the hang of being inside a car, start the engine and stay inside for a few minutes.
— If your dog shows no signs of anxiety, move up and down your driveway. Take a short drive around the block if all goes well.
— Don’t forget to reward your dog with praise or treats!
— Make a few practice drives in and around your neighborhood.
— Plan a short trip to a nearby park or beach. Your dog will learn to associate car rides with playtime at fun places.

How to Prepare for Your Dog's First Road Trip!

Time for Your Checkup!

Now that your dog is roadworthy, it’s time for a visit to the doctor. Taking your dog to the veterinarian before you travel is crucial, especially when going with puppies or seniors. The vet will check if your dog is healthy enough to make the trip and ensure that all Fido’s vaccines are current.

While you’re at the vet, get your dog microchipped as an extra layer of security in case she gets lost. Ask for preventive measures such as anti-tick, flea and heartworm medications if you’re going camping in the woods. If your dog suffers from motion sickness, ask the vet for treatment options.

The Packers

Now that your dog is healthy and ready to travel, it’s time to pack your bags. Dogs are notoriously poor packers, so you need to pick up the slack and pack a bag for your pooch! Preparing Fido’s bag is a little different from yours.

Here’s a list of what to bring for your dog:

— Dog food
— Water
— Favorite chew toys
Treats
— Ideal bed, pillow, and blanket
— Towels
— Leash
— Harness
— Collar and dog tag
— First aid kit
— Medications
— Collapsible bowls for food and water
— Poop bags
— Recent photo of your dog in case he gets lost
— Protective clothing (socks, vest) in case the weather gets bad

Your dog will be in an unfamiliar place, so it’s necessary to bring his favorite toys, bed, and blankets to make him feel at home. A first aid kit for dogs is essential, especially if you guys are roughing it. Remember: What you need to bring will entirely depend on where you are headed. For instance, towels and even a doggy life jacket may be necessary if you are traveling to a lake or to the beach

Also, If your dog is a runner, I cannot recommend an LED dog collar enough. Nothing is worse than the thought of losing your dog while on vacation. The bright lights on these collars will allow you to easily locate your dog – some can even be seen up to half a mile away at night.

What’s in a first aid kit for dogs?

It’s better to pack a separate first aid kit for your dog. The usual contents of an emergency kit are:

— Gauze
— Tweezers
— Skin stapler
— Sterile pads
— Iodine
— Mild soap
— Towel
— Muzzle
— Vet wraps
— Thermal blanket
— List of all veterinarians in the area

How to Prepare for Your Dog's First Road Trip!

Planning Your Route

Once you decide on where to go, the next step is to map the route and plan your stops. You should expect to stop for a potty break every 2 – 3 hours. Take into consideration your four-legged passenger. Puppies and older dogs need to make stops more often.

Dogs love consistency, so use these breaks to hydrate and feed Rover if it’s feeding time. Just don’t go overboard with the food to avoid accidents inside the car! Use these regular pit stops to walk and play with your dog, so he can use up any excess energy and be more relaxed in the car.

You should aim for a route that has plenty of rest stops big enough for your dog to walk around and play in. If the designated stop is next to a park or wide-open field, the better.

Booking a Destination

It’s imperative that you call your desired destination first before heading out. Not all hotels and establishments are pet-friendly, so calling ahead will help avoid any issues. If you’re going camping, call the park and book a slot in advance.

Most parks have a limit on how many campers and pets they allow. Take this time to acquaint yourself on any rules the park or hotel has about bringing pets.

Prepping Your Car

Your dog isn’t the only one that needs prepping. You should equip your car with all the necessary tools to make your dog safe and comfy during the trip.

Consider getting the following:

— Seat belt harness
— Dog hammock
— A barrier for the back seat
— Dog car seat
— A dog crate or carrier

You should also set some ground rules when your dog is inside the car.

Make sure that your dog:

— Never bothers you during your driving, so no riding shotgun.
— Doesn’t stick her head out of the window.
— Is tethered via a seat belt harness.
— Has a secure space at the back, like a dog crate, hammock or car seat.
— Has his favorite toys, bed or blanket to help ease the stress of travel.

How to Prepare for Your Dog's First Road Trip!

Before You Go

Dogs seem to have boundless energy, which can cause restlessness during a road trip. If your dog is like the Energizer bunny, take him for a walk or get some playtime in. Activities such as fetch, tug of war and soccer can help your dog use up some of his excess energy.

With all the extra energy zapped out, your dog is more likely to relax and chill during your trip. Fluffy may even fall asleep! You also shouldn’t feed your dog a lot before leaving. Try to limit food intake, and don’t feed your dog an hour before the trip.

Time to Hit the Road

So, what are you waiting for? Now that you know how to prepare for your dog’s first road trip, it’s time to put words into action and get to it! By following all the tips and tricks in this article, you’re making sure that only good times with your lie ahead.  Oh, and never leave your dog alone in the car – the temperature can soar in minutes!

Happy trails!

How to Prepare for Your Dog's First Road Trip!

CBD Oil for Dogs with Arthritis: 5 Things You Must Know

CBD Oil for Dogs with Arthritis: 5 Things You Must Know

Research has shown that while CBD oil is not a cure for arthritis in dogs, it possesses the power to alleviate its symptoms. Studies have shown that the risks of arthritis and other inflammation-related disorders in dogs increases as they age. CBD oil will act as a pain reliever, targeting the aching joints and providing your dog with necessary relief.

CBD soothes the chronic inflammation triggering arthritis, allowing your dog to heal faster and eventually live a normal life. But there are certain things you need to know about using CBD Oil for dogs arthritis & joint pain. For one thing, it is important you take your dog to get a proper diagnosis, as there are certain symptoms of arthritis that resemble symptoms of other conditions. A proper diagnosis will confirm whether your pooch is truly suffering from arthritis.

CBD oil is not Psycho-active in nature

Many dog owners believed that CBD, found in hemp, makes humans high, and therefore the CBD oil may have psycho-active effects in dogs. This is absolutely unfounded. It is the THC (Tetra-Hydro Cannabinol) found in marijuana that causes psycho-activities in humans and this substance is not found in CBD oil.

For this reason, your dog will not experience a high when given CBD oil. She will be more relaxed while the oil speeds her recovery from arthritis, but without intoxication. But the fact that there are no psychoactive effects from taking this substance does not mean you should overdose your dog. You should start administering the oil at 0.5mg or less per day, and then increase the dose slowly while monitoring any potential improvement.

Starting the oil treatment on your dog on a very high dose can cause sedation of the animal, a condition that is characterized by extreme tiredness. In most cases, outdoor and more active dog breeds will require higher doses than indoor dog breeds.

CBD Oil for Dogs with Arthritis: 5 Things You Must KnowCBD oil works by reducing the secretion of Cytokines that cause inflammation

The main reason why your dog continuously suffers inflammatory pains associated with arthritis is that Cytokines are continuously released. While CBD itself will not cure arthritis, it will reduce the release of Cytokines significantly, until your dog hopefully no longer feels the inflammatory pains of arthritis, which means that the healing of the affected joints will speed up.

The release of excessive Cytokines can trigger auto-immune reactions and hypersensitivities. CBD can help suppress “TH17 dominance” which is a phenomenon linked to autoimmune disease such as arthritis. CBD is rich in antioxidative powers, and it is much more powerful than other antioxidants, including Vitamins C and E.

CBD oil delivers better and faster results than CBD treats

In cases where you cannot get access to CBD oils, you can give a CBD treat to your dog. CBD oils tend to deliver faster and more efficient results in preventing arthritis symptoms because it is applied orally and the rate at which it is absorbed into the bloodstream is higher. For this reason, dogs tend to respond to the oral application of the oil faster than through CBD treats.

It takes a longer time for your dog’s system to digest and absorbed CBD oil from treats, which means it can take several hours for him to feel the positive anti-inflammatory effects of the substance. Another reason why it is better to apply the oil orally than adding it to dog treats is that some dog breeds are sensitive to odor and may reject food with a strange odor. If you do have to add the oil to your dog’s treats then you have to add quite a low dose so that he won’t detect the addition of the oil.

One milligram of CBD oil for each 10-pounds of weight is recommended

It is important to read the dosage instructions on any CBD oil product for dogs before applying the substance. A full dropper of CBD oil normally contains up to 30 drops. If your dog weighs 10 pounds or less, you can add two 1 mg drops of CBD. For a dog weighing up to 20 pounds, you can apply 2 mg of the oil (4 drops); apply 3 mg (6 drops) of the oil for dogs that weigh up to 30 lbs. Dogs weighing more than 100 lbs. will require up to 20 drops, or 10 mg of the CBD oil.

Generally, 10 mg should be the maximum dose you should give to your dog. If you notice no change to her arthritis symptoms then you need to contact your veterinarian. Sticking to the weight/dosage rules will help you avoid accidentally sedating your dog. Also pay attention to the concentration of the CBD oil product you have purchased.

CBD Oil for Dogs with Arthritis: 5 Things You Must KnowCBD oil can be used with a non-CBD treat

There are so many ways you give CBD oil to your dog, one of which is by applying the drops to her treats. CBD oil tinctures are often available in the 225 mg, 450 mg, and 900 mg bottles.

When applying the oil on a non-CBD treat, make sure you use the body weight and dosage rules (i.e., 1 mg per 10 pounds of body weight, etc). You can add the oil twice a day at a space of 12 hours apart to achieve the best possible effect.

Conclusion

There are a wide range of CBD oil brands out there but they all quality oils offer the same benefits, especially if they contain the right concentration, potent enough to speed up recovery from arthritis symptoms. You should avoid imitations, especially those found over the counter. You can ask your veterinarian for recommended outlets where original oils are sold.

The original oil should not contain Cannabinoid crystals, and the color should be almost clear. Cannabinoid oils mixed with water, fruits and some other substances will have shades of other colors, and you should avoid buying such products. And be sure to only buy Cannabinoid oil bottles that are properly covered with sealable caps.

Aslan the Anatolian Shepherd

Aslan the Anatolian Shepherd

Here are some more pictures of Aslan to feature again on DogPerDay. Aslan likes to curl up in the small dog beds we have for the other pooches. He loves balls of all sizes and textures. His favorite is featured in one of these shots… it’s bouncy, he can fit it in his mouth, and it doubles as a chew toy. He loves to pose for pictures. Either that or he’s just wondering what this silly human is doing as she’s points her iPhone at him (instead of reprimanding him for jumping up on the couch). When Aslan is in our fields he’s always on alert and watching every car, human or animal that passes by, and often lets out a deep “who goes there” bark. He’s also been to his first puppy class at Petco and did well, and he returned for puppy play time which was probably the best day he’s had since he slept for two hours when he came home. Submitted by Danna P.

Aslan the Anatolian Shepherd

Aslan the Anatolian Shepherd

Aslan the Anatolian Shepherd

Aslan the Anatolian Shepherd

Aslan the Anatolian Shepherd

 
McKayla the Hound, Shepherd Mix

McKayla the Hound, Shepherd Mix

McKayla came to our shelter in November of 2018 and was adopted in December 2018. She was returned in February of this year. Her adopters didn’t have the time needed to spend with a puppy, so they felt it best to bring her back. Puppies need attention and time. They have to learn manners, commands, routines, housetraining, etc. McKayla needs to find a family willing to give her time to blossom. She is eight months,and is a very loving and affectionate girl, a little shy, but genuinely wants to be a good dog who belongs. Submitted by Washington Wilkes Animal Shelter, Georgia.

McKayla the Hound, Shepherd Mix

McKayla the Hound, Shepherd Mix